May 7, 2017 No Comments
Map Unavailable

Date and time of the event

Admission
Suitable for children?
Yes
Contact
Dr Johanna Wadsley
Email
johanna.wadsley@open.ac.uk
Telephone
07792683196

Live webstream broadcast of the dawn chorus from the hides at Cley Marshes, north Norfolk coast, by the Sounding Coastal Change project.

This is a collaboration with the Norfolk Wildlife Trust for the Cley Calling celebrations.

Listen at www.soundingcoastalchange.org from 04:15 – 06:15, then meet the sound recordists, Richard Fair and Dr Johanna Wadsley, at the Bird Bonanza event, NWT Cley Visitor Centre, between 10:00 and 11:30.

Norfolk Wildlife Trust, Cley and Salthouse Marshes Visitor Centre

Coast Road, Cley-next-the-Sea, Holt, Norfolk NR25 7SA

Tel: 01263 740008

cley@norfolkwildlifetrust.org.uk

 

Sounding Coastal Change

Sounding Coastal Change is a research project about environmental and social change in North Norfolk. The idea is to use sound, music and different kinds of listening, to explore the ways in which the coast is changing and how people’s lives are changing with it. The research team includes geographers, musician/composers and sound artists, and an art/documentary film-maker. We work collaboratively with residents, school children and young people, local interest and community groups, institutional stakeholders and their representatives, and visitors to the area. We explore coastal change through workshops, live performances, radio broadcasts, sound installations and interactive exhibitions. Examples of sound works, music recordings, photography and film produced through the project are geotagged and uploaded to an interactive sound map, to both document the project as well as showcase the creations of the people we collaborate with. The project is funded by the Open University, the University of Dundee and the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC). The project home is Blakeney village.

 

 

 

Written by SoundingCoastalChange
Sounding Coastal Change is a research project about environmental and social change in North Norfolk. The idea is to use sound, music and different kinds of listening, to explore the ways in which the coast is changing and how peoples’ lives are changing with it. The project home is Blakeney village and the research activities focus upon the village, Blakeney National Nature Reserve, and North Norfolk more generally. Examples of sound works, music recordings, photography and film produced through the project are geotagged and uploaded to the sound map, to both document the project as well as showcase the creations of the people we collaborate with. The project involves residents, school children and young people, local interest and community groups, institutional stakeholders and their representatives, and visitors to the area. The research team includes geographers, musician/composers and sound artists, and an art/documentary film-maker. The National Trust is the primary project partner. Other in-kind partners/collaborators/supporters include The Pilgrim Federation of Church of England Schools, St. Nicholas’ Church, Blakeney Parish Council, the Norfolk Wildlife Trust, Future Radio (Norwich) and the British Library Sound Archive. The project is funded by the UK’s Arts and Humanities Research Council (ARHC Grant Ref: AH/P000126/1 Listening to Climate Change: experiments with sonic democracy), The Open University and the University of Dundee. Following a live broadcast as part of International Dawn Chorus Day (7 May 2017), the project launch takes place in the first week of July 2017, with school workshops, sound installations in local venues, and a live performance event at St. Nicholas’ Church, Blakeney (please see the events/activities page for more information). The creative highpoint is the spring and summer of 2018, when the project culminates in a series of workshops, radio broadcasts, live performances and interactive exhibitions. The project runs until March 2019, wrapping up with the publication of two free-to-download, media-rich e-books about the project, and deposits of our sonic and film work in various national archives.